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  HUMAN RABBITS
  Melbourne, Australia. July 28, 2017.

 
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  Fifty human rabbits invade downtown Melbourne. They walk the streets and laneways of the city scattered or in a herd, wearing big rabbit cardboard-heads on their shoulders. They walk fast, and suddenly stop from time to time, often looking sideways.

In 1859, a colonist released in Australia twelve pairs of wild European rabbits that he had brought from England to hunt. The abundance of food, the lack of natural enemies and the rate at which rabbits breed, caused an invasion of 10 billion rabbits half a century later. The intruders ate the forage of the native animals and occupied their burrows. Many species were extinguished, and entire forests disappeared.

In order to fight against the pest, foxes were imported, a rabbit-proof fence was built across the country, and a bacteriological war was declared in the 1950s which finally proved effective: more than half of the European rabbit population had been exterminated. Gradually, the local fauna and flora were restored.

This thought-provoking street action is specifically designed to be held in Australia. There, rabbits are viewed negatively as invasive animals that destroy the local ecosystem, but universally rabbits are seen as cute and cuddly animals, and are considered pets in many countries. These contradictory associations, negative and positive, urge us to openly consider, not without a touch of humour, the concepts of immigration, invasion, group and identity.

An action part of the first retrospective exhibition of mmmm... RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Australia. 2017. With the support of the Embassy of Spain in Australia.





 
     
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